Back to Regular Programming: Are Australians Ready to Go Back to Normal?

As of this writing, coronavirus cases are continuously falling in several Australian states and territories. This enabled some state governments to lift restrictions and allow people to have a small sense of normalcy. But is it really time to draw the curtains and push open those sliding glass door systems and venture out into the world?

Australians were quick to comply when they were told to stay at home in order to prevent the virus from spreading. For some time, people would only go out to buy supplies, exercise and seek medical help. And while many people are eager to go back to their pre-coronavirus routine, others might be hesitant to return to their previous lifestyle.

Take a look at what people think.

Not Everyone Is Eager to Be Out and About

Vox Pop Labs recently collaborated with the ABC to determine whether Australians are ready to toss aside social isolation and get back to their normal lives. According to their recent survey, which involved 2,225 participants, only one in eight are willing to attend a large social gathering. Even less than that, only one in five Australians are willing to board a plane in the near future.

And no matter how much people need a drink because of how stressful and worrying the coronavirus situation is, only 40% of Australians are willing to visit the local bar or dine at their favourite restaurant once the restrictions have been lifted.

It’s safe to say that even though Australia is handling coronavirus pretty well, people will remain cautious way after the situation has been cleared.

Transitioning to Normal Could Take Time

It’s great to stay at home and avoid social interaction when you’ve had a particularly hard day. When you’re forced to stay at home for a prolonged period, however, you might be itching to go out and visit the local bar. But will you go out even though you can?

Despite Australia’s effective handling of the virus, citizens are still hesitant to leave their homes or be with large groups of people. Although people are glad that states are either easing restrictions, many feel like they shouldn’t rush into their pre-coronavirus lifestyle.

These mixed feelings about the situation are totally valid, says psychologist Dr Rachael Murrihy of The Kidman Centre. The global health crisis is something that none of us could have foreseen so there’s no telling how much of an impact it can make on society — and how long its effects will be.

Similar to how the vaccine is at least a year away and how coronavirus-related anxiety won’t leave immediately, it might be best to transition slowly to life before COVID-19.

Always Remain Cautious

person washing hands

The number of coronavirus cases in Australian states and territories might be decreasing. This doesn’t mean that people should be complacent, though. Medical experts have yet to find a vaccine for the virus so, for now, it’s best to follow the advice of the Department of Health.

Continue the habit of frequently washing your hands. Cover your mouth when you cough or sneeze. Maintain a safe distance from others when you go out. And most importantly, wear a face mask when you are sick. Whether you’re ready to return to normalcy or not, keep yourself protected.

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