Foie La La

Finished and sliced Foie Gras Torchon

Foie week is here and we will Foie la la la la all week-long. To start our festivities you obviously need some high quality foie gras. (Like the duck foie gras we got from Blackstar gourmet.) When you get good quality foie gras, it can be served as is, hot or cold. I, however, often prefer to make a torchon. The word  torchon is French and refers to the linen dish towel which is used to wrap the foie gras in the final steps of preparation. I like the torchon because it takes an  incredible product and elevates it even higher standard and elegance. It also gives me a very consistent product and a way to evenly portion the foie gras. Once made, the torchon can be frozen and keeps well. It takes several days to make a torchon, but only really 2 days of work. Do not worry- we have an instructional video which will put out (hopefully at weeks' end) to walk you through this one step at a time. Let's get started:  

Foie Gras Torchon Preparation   

  • Day 1

Foie Gras in its native state after overnight buttermilk soak, demonstrating the 2 lobes it consists of, a larger and smaller

  • Remove Foie gras from package (I use a 1.25 to 1.5 pound pice of foie gras, Grade A )
  • Soak overnight in buttermilk

Note: Due to the modern packaging of high quality foie gras, this traditional step is not completely necessary. It was originally used to extract any remaining bits of blood, etc. from the foie gras prior to working with it. I like to do it, but it is optional.    

  • Day 2
    • Prepare the salt-sugar mixture:     
      • 2 ½ tsp Kosher salt
      • ¼ tsp sugar
      • ¼ tsp ground white pepper
    • Remove the foie from the milk, dry and let sit at room temperature for 45 minutes (it is easier to work with this way)
    • Separate into 2 lobes, work each in turn
    • Working with each lobe individually, dissect out the veins and remove any bruised or blood stained areas (the blood spots will give your final product unattractive "spots". We will show how to dissect out in the video.) It is a bit tedious but very easy. Remember, you can't really screw up taking out the big veins as you can form the foie gras back towards original shape and we're going to be compressing this as two big pieces anyway. When you find a big veing follow it back as far as you can digging theough the foie.  Also remove any membranes at the surfacr covering the liver as you work with it as well as any bruised areas.
    • Try to maintain as much “lobal” integrity as possible as this results in a smoother looking final product
    • Place in a container and layer the foie gras lobes  so they are about ¾ to 1 inch in thickness. They will feel and resemble two big chunks of clay. Like clay, if they do fall apart you can push them together and with gentle pressure form them back towards original shapes.
    • Top with salt-sugar mixture
    • Refrigerate overnight

     

The cleaned cured foie gras after being formed into a log in parchment paper

  • Day 3
    • Allow the foie gras to come to room temperature for about 45 minutes
    • While the foie gras comes up to room temperature, heat enough light chicken stock to cover the rolled foie gras to a poaching temperature (~165-180 degrees F); also prepare an ice bath.
    • Place the foie gras lobes on parchment paper on top of a bamboo rolling mat (you don't need the mat, but I find it helpful to form the log)
    • Form a loaf around 3 ½ inches wide by 6-9 inches long
    • Use the mat to roll a loaf shape (seen in the picture above)
    • Transfer to a sheet of cheesecloth about 1 foot wide by 2 feet long
    • Roll the foie gras in the cheesecloth by rolling away from you as someone else keeps tension on the cheesecloth

    The rolled foie gras, notice you can see some of the foie gras squeezing through the cheesecloth indicating a good tight wrap.

    • Tighten and tie each end with twine (make sure you have wrapped it tight. Some foie gras squeezing through the cheesecloth is a good sign)
    • Tie off three equal sections along the roll
    • Poach the foie gras for about 90 seconds (do not go longer, you are reforming the foie gras not making stock). I use light chicken stock to poach it in

         

    Poaching the foie gras, it is normal to lose some volume

    • Place immediately in ice bath
    • Roll up in dishtowel (I like the traditional final wrap, that is after all how torchon got its name). Roll it the same way you did in the cheescloth; very tightly.

    Final step allowing the Foie Gras Torchon to hang overnight in the refrigerator

    • Tie off each end
    • Hang in refrigerator overnight

        

Slicing the Foie Gras Torchon, now ready to be enjoyed....

 Don't worry, you can always by foie gras already in a torchon!

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